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Department of Health, Physical Education
and Recreation

  Students in an Associate in Arts program are required to earn two credit hours from Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPR).  One (1) of the required credits must be earned through a course that makes use of the Wellness Center.  Wellness Center courses require regular participation at the Wellness Center.  A comprehensive fitness assessment is conducted at the beginning of each semester and an exercise program is designed for each student.  Wellness 


Center courses are listed in bold below along with other HPR courses:  .

    HPR 1021—STEP Aerobics (1 credit hour) Theoretical Bases and lab experiences in rhythmical activities for cardiovascular development.  (Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 1051—Concepts of Strength Training (1 credit hour) These courses include various exercises and activities such as speed/agility training, stretching, and abdominal exercises. Basic and advanced weight training is included in this class. No lecture is involved. Two activity sessions per week. (Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 1011—Recreational Tennis (1 credit hour) This course is designed to develop fundamentals of play including all basic shots. Open to all students. Two activity sessions per week. (No Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 1111—Ballroom Dance (1 credit hour) This course will introduce students to six major dances in American style ballroom.  Students will learn basic patterns, rhythms, lead and follow techniques, and the rudiments of styling that accompany the six major dances: cha-cha, rumba, east-coast swing, foxtrot, tango, and waltz.  (Aerobic Room Access)
    HPR 1213—Personal and Community Health (3 credit hours). Prerequisite: A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of "C" or better.
    Class Description: Application of principles and practices of healthful living to the individual and community. Major health problems and the mutual responsibilities of home, school, and health agencies are addressed. Two lecture hours per week and 90 minutes of lab sessions per week. (Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 1591—Health Concepts (1 credit hour) A thorough investigation of contemporary health fitness concepts as they pertain to the individual student. Three 30-minute lab sessions. (Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 1752—Nutrition and Wellness (2 credit hours). Course designed to expose the student to the importance and significance of nutrition in health and physical education. Places emphasis on the various aspects of wellness and their relationship to weight control and therapeutic exercise. One lecture hour per week required for course, and 90 minute lab session. (Wellness Center Access)
    HPR 2423—Football Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite:  A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better. Theoretical Study of football from an offensive and defensive standpoint including the fundamentals of blocking, passing, tackling, punting, learning rules and team play.  (No Wellness Center Access)   Three lecture hours per week.
    HPR 2433—Basketball Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite:  A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better.  Theoretical study of basketball from an offensive and defensive standpoint, including the study of teaching the fundamentals and team organization.  (No Wellness Center Access)  Three lecture hours per week
    HPR 2443—Concepts of Athletic Training (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better. A practical study of safety and first aid, taping, bandaging, and use of massage, and the uses of heat, light, and water in the treatment and prevention of injuries; conditioning of athletes as to diet, rest, work, and proper methods of procedures in training sports. (No Wellness Center Access) Three lecture hours per week
    HPR 2453—Baseball Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite:  A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better.  Theoretical Study of coaching baseball, and a study of baseball team fundamentals and individual fundamentals.  Also includes recruiting, team offensive and defensive philosophies.  (No Wellness Center Access)  Three lecture hours per week.
    HPR 2463—Tennis Theory (3 credit hours) Prerequisite:  A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better.  Theoretical study of tennis and the comparison to coaching other sports, including the fundamentals of teaching all shots, singles and doubles strategies.  Fundamentals of teaching privately as well as coaching and organizing High School/Junior College teams for team play.  (No Wellness Center Access)  Three lecture hours per week.
    HPR 2742—Taping and Wrapping of Athletic Injuries I (2 credit hours)Prerequisite:  A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better.  This course is designed to prepare future coaches, athletic trainers, and student athletic assistants in practical taping and wrapping by experiences consisting of observation and actual taping of all types of athletic injuries.  (No Wellness Center Access)  Two lecture hours per week.
    HPR 2752—Taping and Wrapping of Athletic Injuries II (2 credit hours) Prerequisite: A score of 16 on the Reading portion of the Enhanced ACT or REA 1013 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is a continuation of HPR 2742. (No Wellness Center Access) Two lecture hours per week.

Instructors for the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation are: 

Tara Rouse, B.S, M.S. (Chair of the Health, Physical Education and Recreation Department and Director of Wellness Center)

Jamie Dickson, B.S., M.S. (Assistant Director of Wellness Center)

Gabe Willis, B.S. (Fitness/Wellness Specialist)

Kay Kammer (Fitness/Aerobics Instructor)

Julie Pierce, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S. (Fitness/Aerobics Instructor)

Camille Soulier, B.S., M.S.

Toby Bush, B.S., M.S.

Josh Hoffpauir, B.S., M.S.

Trevor Lydic, B.S., M.S.

Kelly McGlocklin, B.S., M.S.

Leigh White, B.S., M.S.

Meghan James, B.S., M.S.

Drew Causey, B.S., M.S.

Tim Hatten, B.S., M.S.

Casey Cain, B.S., M.S.

Tom Smith, B.S, M.S.

Jamie McMahon, B.S, M.S.


Through classroom teaching, the academic foundations presented in the applied programs of the department strengthen individuals to engage in applied arts and human sciences.  Upon transferring to a four year institution and majoring in any of the areas of health, physical education and recreation, students are further prepared for career opportunities in meeting the complex educational, health, leisure and sport science needs of society allowing them to improve upon the complex and dynamic needs for individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities within the state, region and nation. 
 

 

Potential Majors in the areas of Health, Physical Education & Recreation Include:

  1. Exercise Science
  2. Kinesiology
  3. Athletic Training
  4. Therapeutic Recreation
  5. Physical Education K-12
  6. Sports Management
  7. Sport Coaching Education

Check Us Out...
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The PRCC Wellness Center, adjacent to the Associate Degree Nursing building offers a 15,000 square foot facility.  The center is equipped with an elevatedwalking/running track, aerobic exercise room, women's and men's locker rooms, and a large workout area with treadmills, stair climbers, stationary bicycles and weight training machines. 

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For more information contact:
Tara Rouse 601-403-1340
Chair of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department
Lindsay Loustalot 601-403-1062
Nursing/Wellness Coordinator

 

Pearl River Community College
Wellness Center
Box 5635
Poplarville, MS 39470

Wellness is a state of health more positive than the mere absence of disease.  Wellness is the conscious and deliberate effort to stay healthy and achieve the highest potential for physical, social, emotional, intellectual and spiritual well-being. 

Consensus reports show that active, physically fit people enjoy a better quality of life than sedentary individuals.  The leading cause of death in the United States today are life-style related.  Nearly 80% of these deaths could be prevented through a healthy lifestyle program consisting of some of the health related components of physical fitness.